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Author Title Year Journal/Proceedings Reftype DOI/URL
Nicastro, F., Pereira, R., Alberton, B., Morellato, L.P., Baranauskas, M.C. and da S. Torres, R. Enterprise Information Systems (ICEIS 2015) 2015
Vol. 241, pp. 1-26 
inbook DOI  
Abstract: Portable devices have been experimented for data acquisition in different domains, e.g., logistics and census data acquisition. Nevertheless, their large-scale adoption depends on the development of effective applications with a careful interaction design. In this work, we revisit existing strategies for mobile application design and evaluation and use the Semiotic Ladder from Organizational Semiotics as an artifact to organize a set of guidelines. We propose a set of semiotic-informed guidelines with questions for evaluation of mobile application interfaces. We also propose a methodology for the evaluation of mobile application interfaces based on the proposed guidelines set. We demonstrate the use of the proposed methodology in the evaluation of four mobile application interfaces designed for phenological data acquisition in the field.

BibTeX:
@inbook{Nicastro2015Chapter,
  author = {Flavio Nicastro and Roberto Pereira and Bruna Alberton and Leonor Patricia Morellato and Maria Cecilia Baranauskas and Ricardo da S. Torres},
  title = {Enterprise Information Systems (ICEIS 2015)},
  publisher = {Springer},
  year = {2015},
  volume = {241},
  pages = {1--26},
  doi = {http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29133-8%2026}
}
      


Fox, E.A. and da S. Torres, R. Digital Library Technologies: Complex Objects, Annotation, Ontologies, Classification, Extraction, and Security 2014   book URL 
Abstract: Digital libraries (DLs) have introduced new technologies, as well as leveraging, enhancing, and integrating related technologies, since the early 1990s. These efforts have been enriched through a formal approach, e.g., the 5S (Societies, Scenarios, Spaces, Structures, Streams) framework, which is discussed in two earlier volumes in this series. This volume should help advance work not only in DLs, but also in the WWW and other information systems.
Drawing upon four (Kozievitch, Murthy, Park, Yang) completed and three (Elsherbiny, Farag, Srinivasan) in-process dissertations, as well as the efforts of collaborating researchers and scores of related publications, presentations, tutorials, and reports, this book should advance the DL field with regard to at least six key technologies. By integrating surveys of the state-of-the-art, new research, connections with formalization, case studies, and exercises/projects, this book can serve as a computing or information science textbook. It can support studies in cyber-security, document management, hypertext/hypermedia, IR, knowledge management, LIS, multimedia, and machine learning.
Chapter 1, with a case study on fingerprint collections, focuses on complex (composite, compound) objects, connecting DL and related work on buckets, DCC, and OAI-ORE. Chapter 2, discussing annotations, as in hypertext/hypermedia, emphasizes parts of documents, including images as well as text, managing superimposed information. The SuperIDR system, and prototype efforts with Flickr, should motivate further development and standardization related to annotation, which would benefit all DL and WWW users. Chapter 3, on ontologies, explains how they help with browsing, query expansion, focused crawling, and classification. This chapter connects DLs with the Semantic Web, and uses CTRnet as an example. Chapter 4, on (hierarchical) classification, leverages LIS theory, as well as machine learning, and is important for DLs as well as the WWW. Chapter 5, on extraction from text, covers document segmentation, as well as how to construct a database from heterogeneous collections of references (from ETDs); i.e., converting strings to canonical forms. Chapter 6 surveys the security approaches used in information systems, and explains how those approaches can apply to digital libraries which are not fully open.
Given this rich content, those interested in DLs will be able to find solutions to key problems, using the right technologies and methods. We hope this book will help show how formal approaches can enhance the development of suitable technologies and how they can be better integrated with DLs and other information systems.

BibTeX:
@book{Fox-Torres2014DL-frontmatter,
  author = {Edward A. Fox and Ricardo da S. Torres},
  title = {Digital Library Technologies: Complex Objects, Annotation, Ontologies, Classification, Extraction, and Security},
  publisher = {Morgan & Claypool Publishers},
  year = {2014},
  url = {http://books.google.com.br/books?id=kWA-AwAAQBAJ}
}
      


Kozievitch, N. and da S. Torres, R. Digital Library Technologies: Complex Objects, Annotation, Ontologies, Classification, Extraction, and Security 2014 , pp. 1-27  inbook  
Abstract: In order to reuse, integrate, and unify different resources from a common perspective, Com- plex Objects (COs) have emerged to support digital library (DL) initiatives from both theoretical and practical perspectives. From the theoretical perspective, the use of COs facilitates aggregation abstraction. From the implementation point of view, the use of COs helps developers to manage het- erogeneous resources and their components. On the other hand, DL applications still lack support for mechanisms to process and manage COs in services such as reference creation, annotation, content- based searches, harvesting, and component organization. This chapter extends the discussions in the previous books of this series regarding: (i) the formalization of complex objects based on the 5S framework; (ii) the study of three widely used technologies for managing COs; and (iii) a case study discussion on how to handle complex image objects in DL applications. The concepts addressed in this chapter can be used to classify, compare, and highlight the differences among CO-related components, technologies, and applications, impacting DL researchers, designers, and developers.

BibTeX:
@inbook{Kozievitch2014ChapterCO-DL,
  author = {Nádia Kozievitch and Ricardo da S. Torres},
  title = {Digital Library Technologies: Complex Objects, Annotation, Ontologies, Classification, Extraction, and Security},
  publisher = {Morgan & Claypool Publishers},
  year = {2014},
  pages = {1-27}
}
      


Li, L.T. and da S. Torres, R. Digital Libraries Applications: CBIR, Education, Social Networks, eScience/Simulation, and GIS 2014 , pp. 85-120  inbook  
Abstract: Geographic information is part of our daily life. There is a huge amount of information about or related to geographic entities -- documents, photos, and videos that are related to somewhere on Earth -- and people are interested in locating them on maps. The use of map-based browser or geospatial search services is of great relevance in numerous digital libraries. The implementation of such services, however, demands the use of geocoded data collections. Geospatial informa- tion and the challenges to handle it have been for a long time the main concern of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). More recently, with the growth in the number of documents on the Web, the Geographic Information Retrieval (GIR) area emerged to deal with geospatial infor- mation found in documents typically handled by Information Retrieval (IR) and digital library techniques. Furthermore, Web multimedia data like images and videos have been extensively associated with geospatial information. That opened novel research opportunities related to the development of multimodal information retrieval approaches targeted to support queries based, at the same time, on textual, visual, and geospatial information.
In this chapter, we introduce the key concepts related to geospatial information, the use of geographical information retrieval techniques, and the use of multimodal retrieval approaches in geocoding tasks. We also present a case study in the context of the CTRnet digital library focused on geocoding multimedia documents aiming at the creation of map-based browsing services.

BibTeX:
@inbook{Li2014ChapterGIS-DL,
  author = {Lin Tzy Li and Ricardo da S. Torres},
  title = {Digital Libraries Applications: CBIR, Education, Social Networks, eScience/Simulation, and GIS},
  publisher = {Morgan & Claypool Publishers},
  year = {2014},
  pages = {85-120}
}
      


Murthy, U., Delcambre, L.M., da S. Torres, R. and Kozievitch, N. Digital Library Technologies: Complex Objects, Annotation, Ontologies, Classification, Extraction, and Security 2014 , pp. 29-61  inbook  
Abstract: Many scholarly tasks involve annotation and related types of working with contextualized fine-grain information, such as subdocuments. Current approaches to working with subdocuments involve a mix of paper-based and digital techniques, such as superimposed information (SI). SI refers to new information that is created to reference subdocuments in existing information resources. We combine this idea of SI with traditional Digital Library (DL) services to define and develop a DL with SI (an SI-DL). This chapter extends the discussions in the previous books of this series regarding: (i) the review of select definitions; (ii) the extension of the formalization of a DL with superimposed information based on the 5S framework; and (iii) one case study discussion on how to explore the metamodel for SI-DLs.

BibTeX:
@inbook{Murthy2014ChapterSI-DL,
  author = {Uma Murthy and Lois M. Delcambre and Ricardo da S. Torres and Nádia Kozievitch},
  title = {Digital Library Technologies: Complex Objects, Annotation, Ontologies, Classification, Extraction, and Security},
  publisher = {Morgan & Claypool Publishers},
  year = {2014},
  pages = {29-61}
}
      


da S. Torres, R., Kozievitch, N., Murthy, U. and Falcão, A.X. Digital Libraries Applications: CBIR, Education, Social Networks, eScience/Simulation, and GIS 2014 , pp. 1-25  inbook  
Abstract: Technology advancements towards image acquisition, storage, and dissemination have fostered the creation of large image collections. There is a strong requirement to apply effective and efficient digital libraries to manage those materials. One common strategy relies on the use of image visual information to support the creation of different digital library services. In particular, image content has been used to build image search systems, known as Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) systems. These systems perform queries based on image visual properties such as color, texture, and shape information. The content of collection images is characterized by descriptors that encode image visual properties into feature vectors. Later, these features are compared with features extracted from a query pattern (e.g., query image) by means of a distance function. Collection images are ranked according to their distance to the query pattern.
In this chapter we exploit the 5S Framework to propose a formal description for Content- Based Image Retrieval, defining the fundamental concepts and relationships from a digital library (DL) perspective.

BibTeX:
@inbook{Torres2014ChapterCBIR-DL,
  author = {Ricardo da S. Torres and Nádia Kozievitch and Uma Murthy and Alexandre X. Falcão},
  title = {Digital Libraries Applications: CBIR, Education, Social Networks, eScience/Simulation, and GIS},
  publisher = {Morgan & Claypool Publishers},
  year = {2014},
  pages = {1-25}
}
      



Fish Identification Tools for Biodiversity and Fisheries Assessments: review and Guidance for Decision Makers 2013   book  
BibTeX:
@book{Fischer2013FAO,,
  title = {Fish Identification Tools for Biodiversity and Fisheries Assessments: review and Guidance for Decision Makers},
  publisher = {Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations},
  year = {2013}
}
      


Fox, E.A., Murthy, U., Yang, S., da S. Torres, R., Velasco-Martin, J. and Marchionini, G. Teaching and Learning in IR 2011 , pp. 47-60  inbook DOI  
Abstract: Information retrieval graduate courses have been offered each academic year in the Department of Computer Science at Virginia Tech since 1973. The first author has taught those since 1983, except when assigned to an advanced course on Digital Libraries (DL), which includes some sections on information retrieval (IR). Since the early 1990s, the Information Storage and Retrieval course has been improved through a variety of pedagogical enhancements, many of which are reported below; some may be applicable to learners at other sites...

BibTeX:
@inbook{Fox2011ChapterTeaching,
  author = {Edward A. Fox and Uma Murthy and Seungwon Yang and Ricardo da S. Torres and Javier Velasco-Martin and Gary Marchionini},
  title = {Teaching and Learning in IR},
  publisher = {Springer},
  year = {2011},
  pages = {47-60},
  doi = {http://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-22511-6%5C_4}
}
      


da S. Torres, R. and Falcão, A.X. Técnicas e Ferramentas de Processamento de Imagens Digitais e Aplica\ oes em Realidade Virtual e Misturada 2008 , pp. 111-132  inbook  
Abstract: Huge image collections have been created, managed and stored into databases. Given the large size of these collections, it is essential to provide efficient and effective mechanisms to retrieve images and their associated information. This is the objective of the so-called content-based image retrieval -- CBIR -- systems. We present in this tutorial the main problems in the CBIR area, discuss approaches that have been proposed, and suggest some research challenges.

BibTeX:
@inbook{Torres2008ChapterCBIR,
  author = {Ricardo da S. Torres and Alexandre X. Falcão},
  title = {Técnicas e Ferramentas de Processamento de Imagens Digitais e Aplica\ oes em Realidade Virtual e Misturada},
  publisher = {Canal 6 Editora},
  year = {2008},
  pages = {111-132}
}